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Description: Country side rangers take care of the land, facilities and ecology of land to which the public have access. The Ranger will work with the public accessing the land.
Salary: £16000.00 to £30000.00
Hours: 37 hours a week but there may be weekend and evening work.
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Description: Rural Estate Agents provide practical and strategic knowledge to a range of clients involved in buying and selling rural land and property. They can work across a number of areas or specialise including: agricultural, valuation, forestry, residential, commercial. They advise the seller and arrange for the sale of the property, and ultimately negotiate between the seller and buyer.
Salary: £20000.00 to £45000.00 average per year
Hours: 8.30 – 5.30 Monday –Friday.
Description: Farm secretaries are responsible for the day-to-day running of the business side of farms.
Salary: £16000.00 to £37000.00 average per year
Hours: 30 to 40 per week
Description: Working in the field on flora and fauna surveys, relocation etc; working as an Environmental Clerk of Works; working in the laboratory; Report writing for Environmental Impact Assessments
Salary: £17000.00 to £40000.00 per year
Hours: 40 hour week with night survey work
Description: Rural surveyors value the assets of farms and estates, advise clients on legal and tax issues, and plan and develop land use.
Salary: £20000.00 to £45000.00 per year
Hours: Variable
Description: Rural practice surveyors etc. provide practical and strategic knowledge to a range of clients involved in rural land and property. They can work across a number of areas or specialise including: • agriculture • professional services e.g. valuation • forestry • estate/property management. Some of the work relates to estate management and professional consultancy and alternative job titles include land agent, forester, environmental consultant and property manager.
Salary: £20000.00 to £45000.00 average per year
Hours: 0830 to 1730, Monday to Friday
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Rural Ecologist

Description: Working in the field on flora and fauna surveys, relocation etc; working as an Environmental Clerk of Works; working in the laboratory; Report writing for Environmental Impact Assessments
Salary: £17000.00 to £40000.00 per year
Hours: 40 hour week with night survey work

Entry Requirements

Graduate Entry: Biological Science, Zoology, Botany, Environmental Science, Ecology, Geography etc.

Usually expected to progress to Masters Degree in specialist subject and to objtain relevant licences such a great crested newt or bats handing licenses.

Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management awards Chartered Status as Chartered Ecologis (CEcol) and Chartered Enviornmentalist (CEnv)

Skills Required

•a fascination with animals and plants;
•a thorough knowledge of the functioning of natural systems;
•good academic qualifications in biological or environmental subjects;
•expertise in one or more groups of living organisms;
•the facility to infect others with enthusiasm about the natural world;
•enjoyment of fieldwork;
•the staying power needed to complete tedious and sometimes uncomfortable tasks in field or laboratory; and
•an objective approach to conservation issues.

Typical Day

•conduct field surveys to collect biological information about the numbers and distribution of organisms - this may be for a database such as the National Biodiversity Network (NBN)
•carry out taxonomy - the classification of organisms
•apply sampling strategies and employ a range of habitat survey techniques, such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global Positioning Systems (GPS), aerial photography, records and maps
•carry out environmental impact assessments
•analyse and interpret data, using specialist software programs
•work on habitat management and creation
•write reports and issue recommendations
•liaise with, and advise, site managers, engineers, planners and others associated with a survey
•build relationships with stakeholders, including members of the public
•carry out research
•undertake teaching in schools or in field centres
•keep up to date with new environmental policies and legislation
•contribute ideas about changes to policy and legislation, based on ecological findings

Working Hours, Patterns and Environment

Usually 40 hours week, but need for night survey work where required; report writing sometimes to urgent deadlines

Career Path

Graduate Ecologist, Biodiversity Technical Officer, Ranger, Land Manager Adviser  through to Senior or Principal Ecologist - see CIEEM Career Profiles

Katrina Robb

A really rewarding industry

“It’s important to keep rural jobs going. There are not that many (farrier) apprentices being trained in Scotland, so it would be good to encourage more people to do the job.”
Katrina Robb , Farrier
Stuart Lowe

No such thing as an average day

“There’s no such thing as an average day. It can be anything from ploughing to driving in the grain or repairing dykes and fencing. That’s what keeps it interesting.”
Stuart Lowe , Agricultural Contractor