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Salary: £16000.00 to £37000.00 average per year
Hours: 30 to 40 per week
Description: Farm secretaries are responsible for the day-to-day running of the business side of farms.
Salary: £20000.00 to £45000.00 per year
Hours: Variable
Description: Rural practice surveyors provide practical and strategic knowledge to a range of clients involved in rural land and property. They can work across a number of areas or specialise including: • agriculture • professional services e.g. valuation • forestry • estate/property management Some of the work relates to estate management and professional consultancy and alternative job titles include land agent, forester, environmental consultant and property manager.

Rural Surveyor/Estate Agent/Agricutlural Consultant/Land Management/Rural Business Management

Salary: £20000.00 to £45000.00 per year
Hours: Variable
Description: Rural practice surveyors provide practical and strategic knowledge to a range of clients involved in rural land and property. They can work across a number of areas or specialise including: • agriculture • professional services e.g. valuation • forestry • estate/property management Some of the work relates to estate management and professional consultancy and alternative job titles include land agent, forester, environmental consultant and property manager.

Entry Requirements

Many candidates enter the profession with a degree accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). Relevant subjects include:

·       Rural estate and land management

·       Land economy

·       Rural business management

Studying an accredited course shortens the length of time you have to spend in professional training, which lasts at least one year. Some courses include a placement year, which may be with an employer approved by RICS.

Some HND and foundation degrees in land and property studies are acceptable for Associate/RICS status, but they will usually have to be topped-up to degree level in a relevant subject to earn chartered status.

Accredited postgraduate conversion courses are offered for those who did not complete an accredited first degree. Distance learning part-time courses are also available for those who may want to study while working.

RICS (https://www.rics.org/uk/) has more information about becoming a rural surveyor.

Skills Required

  • the ability to deal with a range of different problems
  • skill in forward planning, often using computers
  • the capacity to analyse and present statistical information
  • the ability to negotiate tactfully and diplomatically with people at all levels
  • an understanding of the distinction between different varieties of crops and breeds of animals in assessing their economic viability
  • a genuine interest in the countryside and in how industries/companies work within it
  • good teamworking skills.

Typical Day

  • Create maps using geographical information systems (GIS), satellite imaging and precision measuring instruments.
  • Dealing with grant and subsidy applications
  • Maintaining estate/farm accounts
  • The day to day running of an estate/rural property
  • Producing financial forecasts
  • Negotiating land access, with utility, mining or quarrying companies
  • Assist with valuations for clients, covering property, machinery, crops and livestock. Valuations are usually done for sale, insurance, taxation or compensation purposes

Working Hours, Patterns and Environment

You’ll usually work 0830 to 1730, Monday to Friday. A lot of your time will be spent visiting clients on farms or estates, which could mean early starts and late finishes.

You’ll need to travel. Clients may be spread over a wide area, so you’ll usually need a driving licence.

Career Path

Once you have passed your APC your choice of career path tends to narrow and sometimes offer the opportunity to specialise in a very specific aspect of rural practice, such as land agency (sales), agriculture, valuations or renewable energy.

In general smaller firms generally offer a broader mix of experience but fewer opportunities to develop highly-specialised knowledge and expertise.

Katrina Robb

A really rewarding industry

It’s important to keep rural jobs going. There are not that many (farrier) apprentices being trained in Scotland, so it would be good to encourage more people to do the job.
Katrina Robb , Farrier
Stuart Lowe

No such thing as an average day

“There’s no such thing as an average day. It can be anything from ploughing to driving in the grain or repairing dykes and fencing. That’s what keeps it interesting.”
Stuart Lowe , Agricultural Contractor