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Salary: £15500.00 to £40000.00 average per year
Hours: 40 per week
Description: Bakers make bread, cakes and pastries using machines or by hand.
Salary: £15500.00 to £30000.00 average per year
Hours: 38 to 42 per week
Description: Butchers prepare and sell meat and poultry, and make meat products like sausages, burgers and pies.
Salary: £15500.00 to £21000.00 average per year
Hours: 37 to 40 per week
Description: Fishmongers sell fish and seafood products, and advise customers on how to prepare them.
Salary: £15500.00 to £20000.00 average per year
Hours: 38 - 40 hours per week
Description: A food processor sees the production of raw ingredients into a finished meal, usually in a factory environment. You may be freezing, canning, baking, drying, cooking, chilling or pasteurising ingredients and products.
Salary: £20000.00 to £60000.00 average per year
Hours: 40 per week
Description: You will be advising food processors on the safe presentation, preparation and storage of food. You will investigate food related illnesses and inspect food producing premises.
Salary: £20000.00 to £45000.00
Hours: 35 - 40 per week
Description: Food scientists and food technologists develop food and drink products, making sure they are safe to consume.
Salary: £18000.00 to £60000.00 average per year
Hours: 35 - 40 per week
Description: You will be planning and selecting fresh food from producers to sell in retail outlets. You will take into account market trends and quality of the product. You will visit your suppliers regularly to ensure standards are maintained and the product remains competitive.

Food Scientist/Food Technologist

Salary: £20000.00 to £45000.00
Hours: 35 - 40 per week
Description: Food scientists and food technologists develop food and drink products, making sure they are safe to consume.

Entry Requirements

You'll usually need a foundation degree, HND or degree in a subject like food science, food studies or food technology. Employers may also accept other subjects like chemistry or nutrition.

Another way in is to start out as a lab technician and study towards qualifications while you work.

Skills Required

  • Analytical skills
  • The ability to explain ideas to other scientists and production staff
  • Communication
  • Teamwork

Typical Day

As a food scientist, you'll:

  • find ways to save time and money in food making
  • provide accurate nutritional information for food labelling
  • investigate ways to keep food fresh, safe and attractive
  • test the safety and quality of food

As a food technologist, you'll:

  • conduct experiments and produce sample products
  • blend new ingredients to invent and modify recipes
  • design production processes and machinery

You'll need to follow industry regulations.

Working Hours, Patterns and Environment

You'll usually work 9am to 5pm. You may have to work shifts to cover production runs.

You'll work in laboratories and research departments or on production lines in food factories, monitoring operations and quality control. You may need to travel to warehouses, distribution centres and suppliers' factories.

Career Path

You could work for a range of organisations involved in researching and developing new products, including:

  • government and university research establishments
  • food manufacturers and supermarkets
  • local authorities

You could improve your career prospects by getting Registered Scientist (RSci) or Chartered Scientist (CSci) status through the Institute of Food Science and Technology.

With experience you could become a project leader or manage a department like research and development or quality control. You could also move into fields like chemical engineering, agricultural research, toxicology or nutrition science.

Katrina Robb

A really rewarding industry

It’s important to keep rural jobs going. There are not that many (farrier) apprentices being trained in Scotland, so it would be good to encourage more people to do the job.
Katrina Robb , Farrier
Stuart Lowe

No such thing as an average day

“There’s no such thing as an average day. It can be anything from ploughing to driving in the grain or repairing dykes and fencing. That’s what keeps it interesting.”
Stuart Lowe , Agricultural Contractor